Christmas desserts traditions around the world

Christmas desserts are one of the most important aspects of the Christmas celebration. As the table can not be without desserts after lunch, which adults and children will be happy with.

A few days separate us, and the world celebrates “Christmas”, with many wishes and dreams that they want to fulfill. On that day, most mothers are looking for a new way to celebrate with their families differently.

 

Christmas desserts

 

Each country has its own traditions of food during public holidays and holidays, and Christmas is one of the most important holidays that most countries celebrate in their own way, so they start preparing for it with many festive appearances, from the Christmas tree to the distinctive food and sweets, but each country maintains a recipe for sweets for Christmas celebrations It is passed on to generations, and every family is keen to make them, and in the following lines, the Bright Side website collected the most famous sweets in many countries to celebrate Christmas:

Christmas desserts in France:

In France, they eat a rolled dessert that is baked in the form of a tree trunk, and powdered sugar is placed on it, this Christmas desserts tradition comes from the Middle Ages.

England:

 December is the time when every English family eats Christmas desserts, which is a pudding filled with dried fruits and nuts. The dessert is cooked several weeks before Christmas and kept in a cool place, and is served on the first day of the holiday.

Iceland:

 In Iceland, they cook a pie called “vínarterta” also known as “striped lady cake” because it has many layers, and it is considered traditional Christmas desserts. 

It is made of alternating layers of almonds or crackers and plum jam. The jam also contains cinnamon, vanilla, and cloves. Vínarterta is served with coffee.

Scotch Christmas desserts:

 The Scots love sweet foods in general, and each holiday they have is associated with a specific type of dessert, and at Christmas, they bake puddings, cookies with apples, add cream to it, and serve it in cups.

Ireland:

 On the tables of Irish holidays, you can see unusual Christmas desserts, which is called “Guinness cake”.

It is prepared with dark beer, but the dessert is not bitter at all.

Australia:

 In Australia, Christmas comes in the middle of summer, which is why the Christmas desserts they make has nothing to do with winter. 

Their popular Christmas desserts are biscuits called Rocky Road. It is sweet and made of chocolate, milk, and an herbal combination. They are sometimes made in the form of a cupcake with ice cream.

Mexico:

 In South and Central America, they have a popular cake called tres leches, they use 3 types of milk to prepare it: evaporated milk, condensed milk, and heavy cream.

Portugal:

It’s hard to imagine Christmas in Portugal without the traditional polo rei cake, this is the symbol of the season in Portugal and served throughout December until January 6, the cake looks like a crown with sweet fruits and nuts on top.

Hungary:

In Hungary, they have the traditional Christmas desserts called “Dobos cake”, it is consisting of 6 layers of biscuit with chocolate cream and caramel.

Traditional Christmas desserts in Italy:

On Christmas, you can eat a “panettone or bandoro”, and Italians are said to split into two opposing groups depending on which of these two Christmas desserts they prefer.

Panton is a light and sweet pie made with sweet fruits. The romantic story of the origin of this dessert tells that one of the apprentice bakers invented it for his sweetheart, and the bandoro is the sweet yeast bread that looks like a pyramid.

For our part, we have chosen the famous Christmas desserts “Marrons glacés” for you.

What is Marrons glacés, and how can we prepare them at home?

Christmas desserts
marrons glacés

Marrons glacés is a French dessert. It is consisting of chestnuts topped with sugar or juice in sugar syrup and glazed.

(marrons) means brown and (glacés) because you mix it with sugar.

There is no confirmed information about the origins of this type of candy, but it likely appeared for the first time in the sixteenth century in Lyon or Cuneo, In 1882, Clemon Fujier opened the first commercial manufacturing plant for maroon glace.

Marrons glacés are notoriously expensive, so let’s find out how to prepare them at home.

 How to prepare Marrons glacés:

The ingredients:

  • Quantity chestnuts to taste.
  • Enough water to completely cover the chestnut with a little sugar.
  • 2 cups sugar.
  • Cup water.
  • Vanilla.

How to prepare:

  • Peel the chestnuts, by slitting it with a knife two slits in length, and roast a little over the fire to become easy to peel. After that with a note not to let it mature completely.
  • Put the sweetened water on the stove to boil.
  • Add the chestnuts to it, leave it to soften without breaking, and then strain it well.
  • Put sugar, water, and vanilla on the fire without stirring the sugar, and leave the mixture on low heat.
  • As soon as the sugar solution changes color, remove it from the stove.
  • Dip the chestnuts once in the sugar solution, and leave for 5 minutes.
  • Then remove the syrup with a fork carefully so that it does not break, put it in a colander, and leave it in a warm place.
  • The next day, heat the sugary syrup, then dip the chestnuts in it, and leave for 5 minutes.
  • Then tweeze in the same way as before, and leave to dry completely.
  • Carefully lift each grain with a fork so as not to break and put it in a jar.
  • Add the sugar solution to the jar, close it well, and leave it for an entire night.

 

We take out the maroon glace afterward and place it in plaster paper and serve and can be decorated with melted chocolate as desired.

 

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